Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals

PUMA Progress Report 2017

As the first company to sign a Greenpeace Detox commitment, PUMA has manifested its support for the precautionary principle, the elimination of hazardous chemicals and transparency in the supply chain already in 2011. This commitment remains unchanged today and we will continuously report on our progress against our set targets.

1. Phase-out of PFCs

As part of our commitment to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals by 2020, we have phased-out the usage of long-chain per- and polyfluorinated Chemicals (PFCS) since 2015.  At the end of 2017, 99% of all PUMA products were produced PFC-free.Our PFC phase-out is driven by the PUMA material sourcing teams from all three PUMA product categories, and is realized by our materials suppliers globally in close collaboration with their chemical suppliers.

For some special applications PFC-free finishes do not fulfil our product requirements for example in regard to oil repellency. That means less than one percent of our products still contain short-chain PFCs until alternative chemical products are available that can provide the required performance. We will continue our research in this field and adopt new available technologies wherever possible.

2. Disclosure / Wastewater Testing

While usage of safe and clean input chemistry is the pre-condition on a road to zero discharge of hazardous chemicals, testing of wastewater provides an indication on whether any hazardous substances may have slipped through the input controls or have formed during the production process. Wastewater testing can also be used to screen the effectiveness of effluent treatment systems regarding conventional wastewater parameters such as BOD, COD, pH, etc.

Therefore, together with other ZDHC brands, we have asked our key suppliers with wet processing facilities to test their wastewater for both priority chemicals and conventional parameters and share the results of these tests by uploading them on the platform of the Chinese NGO Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs (IPE).

In 2017, a first round of our wastewater test campaign was launched on 1st April. We had scheduled a second test round to be completed before 31st October. The results were disclosed either on the IPE platform and uploaded to the ZDHC Gateway in the Wastewater Module.

By analyzing the results  from 42 factories with direct discharge, some key figures can be drawn as below.

Conventional wastewater parameters:

A summary of the results of the tests can be found in Chart 1.

For conventional wastewater parameters, when compared to the Foundational limits of the ZDHC 2016 Wastewater Guidelines, pH test results have a 100% compliance rate, while Temperature, TSS, COD, Color, N-NH4, AOX, Oil & Grease, Phenol and Sulfide show compliance rates above 90%. The Coliform compliance rate was found to be not reliable due the long delivery time between the factories and the labs. Therefore, this parameter it is not listed in the chart.

Chart 1: The statistical results of conventional wastewater parameters from direct discharge factories

 

Heavy Metals: 

As shown in Chart 2, for all samples the measurements show compliant results for Chromium (Cr), Copper (Co), Nickel (Ni), Silver (Ag), Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium VI (Cr VI), Lead (Pb) and Mercury (Hg) compared to Foundational limits of the ZDHC Wastewater Guidelines. Checking test results against “Progressive” limits, full compliance can still be achieved for Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Silver (Ag) and Lead (Pb).

Chart 2: The statistical results of heavy metals in wastewater

 

MRSL Parameters:

The analytical results for the MRSL parameter groups are listed in Chart 3.

All priority chemicals achieve a compliance rate over 90%. Azo, Carcinogenic and Disperse Dyes, as well as Flame Retardants and Glycols are even fully compliant, which means that they were not detected in the wastewater.

Chart 3: Compliance rates of MRSL parameters in the wastewater

To harmonize wastewater testing for both conventional parameters and MRSL substance groups, the ZDHC is currently working on a defined limit for the pollutants in sludge. PUMA supports this effort and stands ready to pilot the new guidance document once it is released.

The wastewater testing results for 2015 and 2016 can be found here:

Wastewater Test Results 2015

Wastewater Test Results 2016

The link to our Wastewater Test Results 2017 are listed below:

No.

Factory

Country  

2017 IPE web page for the disclosed information

1

Tong Hong Beihai

CN

Link

2

Tong Hong

VN

Link

3

Hung Fu

VN

Link

4

Prime Aisa VN

VN

Link

5

Sadesa

TH

Link

6

PT. DAEHWA

ID

Link

7

Sangfang Vietnam

VN

Link

8

Key

CN

Link

9

Cosmo-Fushan

CN

Link

10

Taiyuan-Globletex

TW

Link

11

Zhanxu-ZHEN YANG

CN

Link

12

Tiong Liong-Sun Luen

TW

Link

13

Shenzhou

CN

Link

14

Gain Lucky

VN

Link

15

Formosa TW

TW

Link

16

Formosa VN

VN

Link

17

Square Fashions

BD

Link

18

Men-Chuen

TW

Link

19

Men-Chuen VN

VN

Link

20

Far Eastern

TW

Link

21

VN Tiong Liong

VN

Link

22

FU HSUN

TW

Link

23

DBL-Hamza

BD

Link

24

DBL-Thanbee

BD

Link

25

Viyellatex

BD

Link

26

Yaw Limay-Summitex

TW

Link

27

CHIN HSIN VN

VN

Link

28

Tai Hing

CN

Link

29

Prime Aisa-Yu Xiang

CN

Link

30

Formosa CS

CN

Link

31

Formosa ZS

CN

Link

32

Kuo Yuen

CN

Link

33

Weitai

VN

Link

34

HYUNDAE

VN

Link

35

YEE CHAIN-YUNG DA

TW

Link

36

Top Star-Jingying

CN

Link

37

Fakhruddin

BD

Link

38

Sue's-CONG TY

VN

Link

39

De Licacy

TW

Link

40

SLN

TK

Link

41

Paxar

CN

Link

42

LEI FENG-Fulong

CN

Link

 

 

 

 

 

Conventional wastewater parameters:

A short summary of the results of the tests can be found in Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

For conventional wastewater parameters, when compared to the Foundational limits of the ZDHC 2016 Wastewater Guidelines, AOX, phenol and cyanide have a 100% compliance rate, while the other parameters range between 81.8% and 95.7% compliance. Only the BOD compliance rate is barely above 70%. For the conventional parameters, only factories with direct discharge results were  included in the charts. Since indirect discharge limits can be quite different depending on the requirements of the receiving treatment plant, they are not considered in the statistics.

Chart 1, 2 and 3: The statistical results of conventional wastewater parameters

Heavy Metals: 

100% of the samples collected have non-detected results for copper, cadmium, and silver;

For cobalt, nickel, zinc, arsenic, chromium VI, lead and mercury all factories comply to 100 percent with the “foundational” level of the ZDHC Wastewater Guideline. For the “progressive” level the compliance rate is 97.7 percent.

Chart 4, 5, and 6: The statistical results of heavy metals in wastewater

 

MRSL Parameter:

The analytical results for the MRSL parameter groups are listed in chart 7.

Carcinogenic and disperse dyes, flame retardants, glycols, and organotin compounds were 100 percent non-detected. Chlorophenol, azo dyes, PFCs, PAHs and VOCs have a non-detected rate of above 90 percent among all samples. The compliance rate for phthalates, halogenated solvents, chlorinated compounds and AP/APEOs is between 77.6 and 86.4 percent.

Chart 7: Compliance rates of MRSL parameters in the wastewater

To harmonize wastewater testing for both conventional parameters and MRSL chemicals, the ZDHC is currently working on a defined limit for the pollutants in sludge. PUMA supports this effort and stands ready to pilot the new guidance document once it is released.

The wastewater testing results for 2015 can be found here.

 

FURTHER UPDATES AND REPORTS

ZDHC UPDATES
2016-2017

ZDHC Gateway – Chemical Module: ZDHC releases the ZDHC Gateway – Chemical Module, an online data sharing portal for chemical companies to asses a chemical product's compliance against ZDHC's MRSL.

Wastewater Guidelines Update: The ZDHC Programme is amending the guideline  standard for wastewater discharge with limit values for sludge that go beyond regulatory compliance to ensure wastewater discharge does not adversely affect the environment and surrounding communities.

Wastewater test reports can now be disclosed on the ZDHC Gateway – Wastewater Module.

 

2015

The ZDHC Programme has released an update of the Joint Roadmap - a clear and strategic effort to tightly focus programme efforts and resources. The update transitions programme efforts from seven workstreams into four focus areas to strategically support all elements of the supply chain in adopting improved chemical management practices.

This Joint Roadmap update builds on ZDHC successes to date and defines the path forward for the next five years.

Based on lessons learned during implementation, subsequent updates have refined and focused ZDHC efforts to drive momentum towards zero discharge. This stage of collaborative evolution moves the group clearly from the development of foundational tools into the territory of tool implementation.

The goal remains more important than ever, contributing to a cleaner environment and laying the foundation for expanding environmental accountability.

Joint Roadmap Update 2015 (PDF)

 

ZDHC PROGRESS REPORTS

To ensure transparency, the group of Signatory Members report regularly and publicly on the progress against the published roadmap (quarterly in 2012, annually from 2013 to 2020).

Annual Report 2015

Annual Report 2014

Annual Report 2013

Annual Report 2012

 

Further published documents, information and tools from ZDHC can be found here: http://www.roadmaptozero.com/programme/

 

PUMA´S RENEWED DETOX COMMITMENT
21/November/2014

Aligned with our July 2011 Detox commitment, our next public steps to the elimination of all hazardous chemical use across our global supply-chain are:

 

  1. Public’s Right to Know

PUMA SE will deliver full transparency of our global supply-chain hazardous chemical use via an M-RSL. 

PUMA SE will deliver public reporting of hazardous chemical use across our global supply-chain, starting with:

i. at least 80% of all “wet processes” including China and other ‘developing world’ suppliers across our global supply-chain, by no later than 31 December 2014 reporting via the IPE Detox platform (www.ipe.org.cn/en/pollution/discharge_detox.aspx);

ii. PUMA SE will ensure full details of our complete wet process global supply-chain are always current and publicly available.

 

  1. PFC Elimination

As PUMA SE is fully implementing the precautionary principle, we publicly commit to eliminating all long-chain (i.e. C7, C8 and longer) PFCs (defined as all poly and per – fluorinated substances and their precursors and metabolites) across our global supply-chain by no later than 01 January 2015 (across all products we produce and/or sell[1]). The elimination of all PFCs used in any of the products we produce or sell will be supported by:

i. PUMA SE commits to eliminate any other PFCs (in addition to our elimination of all “long-chain” PFCs) identified in the preceding, above, in any of the products PUMA SE produces and/or sells across our global supply-chain, by no later than 31 December 2017[2];

ii. a rigorous system of control to ensure that no traces of PFCs find their way into our supply chain in line with the above;

iii. work in partnership with our supply chain and other global industry leaders to accelerate the move to environmentally responsible non-PFC technologies.

(PUMA SE footnote 4 (July 2011) Precautionary approach: It means that when scientific evidence suggests a substance may harm the environment or human health, but the type or magnitude of harm is not yet known, a preventative approach towards potentially serious or irreversible damage should be taken, recognizing the fact that such proof of harm may not be possible.)

 

[1] products produced with C7 - or longer chain - PFCs before 01 January, 2015 will still be available for sale - for a limited period - after 31 December 2014

[2] products produced with any shorter chain PFCs (<C7) before 01 January, 2018 will still be available for sale - for a limited period - after 31 December 2017

 

 

PUMA, ADIDAS, C&A, LI NING AND NIKE PARTNER TO REACH ZERO DISCHARGE BY 2020

In November 2011, adidas Group, C&A, H&M, Li Ning, NIKE, Inc. and PUMA released a joint roadmap towards zero discharge of hazardous chemicals (ZDHC) in the supply chain by 2020. It is an ambitious plan, one that sets a new standard of environmental performance for the global apparel and footwear industry. The roadmap includes specific commitments and timelines to realize this shared goal. These commitments include:

  • Jointly communicating the mission of zero discharge of hazardous chemicals to all suppliers beginning immediately.
  • Conducting pilot projects at major, vertically integrated and materials suppliers between 2011 and 2013 to better understand scope of use and discharge of hazardous chemicals
  • Verifying that nine classes of hazardous or persistent chemicals are not currently used
  • Initiating an inventory of all chemicals used in apparel manufacturing by the end of 2012
  • Disclosing the results of all pilots and studies undertaken as part of this commitment
  • Reporting regularly and publicly on our progress against this commitment (quarterly in 2012, annually from 2013 to 2020)

Tackling and achieving the goal of zero discharge is a complex challenge – one that our brand collaboration cannot solve alone. Our vision is that the roadmap serves as a benchmark and that many more brands join us in our efforts. Ultimately, we want and need a broad array of participants to partner with us in this endeavor – chemical suppliers, academics, NGOs, textile experts, entrepreneurs, policy makers and others. We understand that we are setting out to change the way apparel and footwear is manufactured, globally, and are thus casting our net wide for the best ideas and solutions.

For more information on the Joint Roadmap and the progress of the ZDHC, please visit:

http://www.roadmaptozero.com